How Owning Small Business Changes Views About Money-Podcast 682

Life is a journey and a process. These days there’s so much noise we forget how our experiences change our attitudes. Time for an easy talker about the challenges, changes and benefits of being an entrepreneur in How Owning Small Business Changes Views About Money-Podcast 682.

Spitting Into The Wind

One of the major news stories in the present time frame is the question of the so called tax reform bill. A podcaster wonders whether to do another podcast celebrating or condemning this legislation and concludes a discussion along these lines won’t advance the story. Especially relevant are the experiences of being in business and how it has changed how I think about money, labor and providing a service.

Owning A Business Changes A Life

In How Owning Small Business Changes Views About Money-Podcast 682 one of the key turning points in the life of a small business person is the transition from an employee mindset and the mindset of an entrepreneur. Moreover there’s also a change in how the business person thinks about service to clients and in the case of communications, the audience.

Freedom Isn’t Free

Most Americans these days grew up in middle class families. We were taught to work hard, tell the truth and to follow the rules. For the most part these are bedrock lessons we all need to learn. However one of the first lessons one learns in business is the heady freedom of being your own master. This turns out to be a great challenge. We’ll talk about it in How Owning Small Business Changes Views About Money-Podcast 682.

Take The Risk

Considering making the leap from employee to business owner? How Owning Small Business Changes Views About Money-Podcast 682 might give you some thought starters and things to consider. I am not one to read primers on business or ‘how to’s’. In some ways I wish I was, but then the journey of learning to sail on rough seas wouldn’t be part of the experience. For me, that’s what it’s all about.

Sponsored by Reliafund

How Owning Small Business Changes Views About Money-Podcast 682

 

Friday Night On Mean Street Hennepin Avenue Minneapolis-Podcast 648

Have you been to downtown Minneapolis lately? These days some don’t feel safe there. In Friday Night On Mean Street Hennepin Avenue Minneapolis-Podcast 648 we run the gauntlet on Hennepin Avenue.

After Billions Spent, New Questions About Safety Downtown

The media is starting to ask questions about crime in downtown. Opinion makers and the city’s leaders are apparently concerned. The questions they don’t ask are revealing.

Another New Crisis

The Crisis in American Cities has been grabbing headlines for a hundred years. From The Gateway District to Mayo Square it’s the same formula. Use taxpayer dollars to Demolish. Rebuild. Repeat. Has it been worth it?

Robert Moses and Richard Daley Would Be Proud

Light rail and mixed use condos. Expensive restaurants and Hipster art districts. Bike paths. Safe spaces. Higher Minimum Wages. Political fights about redevelopment and economic inequality. Tax Increment Financing to bring in big retail and big companies.

When these efforts produce mixed results, the process starts all over again. More money. Newer stadiums. More buildings. More condos that are sold as ‘affordable’ but cost at least two hundred thousand dollars. Higher rents. Traffic Jams. Crime.

Downtown Minneapolis was never a ‘thing’

The neighborhoods and retail business were located in North Minneapolis and North East, Uptown, Lake Street in South Minneapolis and Saint Paul’s ‘Midway’. Sure, Hennepin Avenue always featured bars and hotels, places to eat and entertainment. But downtown was for warehouses, light industry, office buildings, city and county government. And drunks.

Not DisneyLand

Let’s just say it. Downtown Minneapolis isn’t Disneyland. It never was. That’s the reason punks loved in in the early 80’s. The gritty nature of Moby’s and other Block E attractions made it ‘charming’. It’s one of the reasons First Avenue was able to gain a foothold as a seminal and nationally famous music and punk culture venue.

These days, the well connected, with impeccable credentials in the Twin Cities’ public-private partnership world, continue to sell ‘more of the same’; Taxes, regulation, and fees that make seeing a show or going to a baseball, football, or basketball game and having dinner after, impossibly expensive for most of the disappearing middle class.

Investment For What?

Want to start a business downtown? Want to buy a condo downtown? Better be juiced into the money or have a lot of money. No wonder people are concerned about the nitty gritty nature of Hennepin Avenue. Walking down this street you’re mixing with the great unwashed. Unruly, scantily clad, vulgar, of different races and often from the poor side of the cities. And it’s really, really fun.

What Does The 21st Century Look Like?

We need to start asking questions about the nature of the city in the mid twenty first century. Retail is dying. Corporations don’t need tons of office space anymore. No one wants to pay more and more tax. No one wants to have to pay 22 dollars for a hamburger to fund the sports cathedrals for billionaire team owners that live around Lake of Isles or out in Minnetonka.

Is the solution really more cops downtown. Another Light Rail line? Subsidized office space? Another redevelopment of Nicollet Mall? More incremental taxes added to the bills at the Smack Shack? Who lives down here? Not the servers. Nor the kids hanging out at the LRT station.

Spend Daddy’s Money Downtown

Downtown Minneapolis is a place for trust fund babies, lawyers and corporates relocating. People who are used to having things their way. No wonder they think it’s unsafe. Sadly, they’re making everyone else pay for their own personal Epcot Center. It’s a con.

Present Becomes Past?

No matter how much they spend when you walk this street, you’re walking where the bums in the Gateway used to spend the winter drinking. The past echoes up and down Hennepin, even if the buildings are long torn down. That’s never going to change.

We Pay For Power In The Shadows

When you think about how much of the taxpayer’s hard earned dollars they’ve spent, one wonders when the Downtown Council and the real shadow power in Minneapolis will be held accountable.

Sponsored by Ryan Plumbing of Saint Paul

Friday Night On Mean Street Hennepin Avenue Minneapolis-Podcast 648

Podcast 580-Bob Davis Podcasts Radio Show-56

Podcast 580-Bob Davis Podcasts Radio Show-56. Four mini podcast for your weekend. It’s time to move beyond talk about fake news and false narratives. Time to work on becoming better citizens. We have to get beyond reactions to get what is needed to create better political structures for the future. People have very high expectations about a Trump presidency. Whether you fear the future or can’t wait for it, the President-Elect’s cabinet nominations are moderate and establishment republicans. Trump’s ideas are philosophically all over the road. The new republican administration may end up being just as statist as a Hillary Clinton presidency. One example is Trump’s penchant for roads and bridges and airports. Given the establishment congress of republican moderates expecting a reduction in the cost and power of the federal government is too much to ask for. Fake News is still ‘in the news’. There were suggestions from the CIA at the end of last week that the Russians ‘could have’ been responsible for the Wikileaks hack. Still no proof though. That doesn’t stop the media from feeding into the Clinton camp narrative that Russia put Trump in the White House. It’s impossible to say what influenced voters in Ohio, Pennsyvania, North Carolina and Florida where Trump won by tight margins. None of these facts stop demands to ‘do something’ about ‘fake news’. FaceBook is caving and censorship is suddenly now a big topic. There have also been reports that Electors (members of the electoral college for 2016) have received death threats. What happens if Trump doesn’t have a majority of electors? What is the goal of people supporting the effort to influence the Electoral College? Have you driven around the country lately? If you had, you would know the United States does not have an ‘infrastructure’ problem. Building new airports, roads and bridges will not create enough new jobs to influence a 16 trillion dollar economy. Moreover, trade protection, cutting taxes on the middle class, increasing spending and government power including military spending is fraught with problems and probably won’t result in economic growth. Where does the money come from for these shiny objects? It has to be taxed or borrowed, sooner or later. For those who supported Trump because he ‘isn’t Hillary’, there are no guarantees he’ll be materially different from Clinton, when it comes to results. Sponsored by Brush Studio in the West End and Ryan Plumbing and Heating of Saint Paul.[Powerpress]

Podcast 560-Bob Davis Podcasts Radio Show-48

Podcast 560-Bob Davis Podcasts Radio Show-48. Live from Garberville, California which I keep referring to as Gerberville in the radio show, so my apologies to the people of Garberville. Coming down out of the mountains in heavy, driving rain for three days will turn your brain to mush. Podcast 560-Bob Davis Podcasts Radio Show-48 is live with brand new content for podcast subscribers. When traveling you have to make adjustments as long trips begin to take on a life of their own. There’s a life lesson there. Maybe there’s a political lesson too. 2016’s presidential campaign has taken on a surreal life of its own. We will be left to pick up the pieces. GOP leadership could have allowed a floor fight in Cleveland which might have yielded better national candidates, but the establishment instead chose power over principle. Has the Republican Party lost its moorings? Is it breaking up on the rocks? You’re supposed to be loyal and vote for Trump so Hillary Clinton doesn’t appoint liberal supreme court justices. Really? Reagan appointed Justice Kennedy and George W. Bush appointed Chief Justice Roberts. Roberts opened the constitutional gate for ObamaCare. Should Trump win the presidency, with the possibility of a democrat senate, nominating judges who pass the ‘conservative litmus test’ will be increasingly difficult. I think the right has lost its reason and its ability to make the powerful economic arguments that used to make it attractive to the middle class. With a morally bankrupt leadership that can’t decide whether to endorse, withdraw endorsement, endorse again or just tell people to vote for Trump ‘because, you know…’ that is pretty much all she wrote for the Grand Old Party. The question is whether the republican rank and file, drunk on rhetorical arguments for every issue, will be able to do the hard work necessary to build a new party. Meanwhile, the GOP is losing women, and struggles to attract younger or minority voters. This show only scratches the surface of how sad it is to watch an old friend die of a terminal disease. Sponsored by Ryan Plumbing and Heating of Saint Paul.[powepress]

Podcast 310

Jeb Bush “Conservative”. Jeb Bush talks about the Middle Class and the American Dream in the nitty gritty northern city of Detroit, Michigan serving up ‘The Right To Rise’ political concept. Will Republicans buy this warmed over rhetoric one more time? If Bush convinces the mainstream GOP ‘he can win’, bet on it. If someone doesn’t come along to counter Bush’s contributions, and command of the rhetorical battleground – regardless of what the few crummy polls say right now – he will be the Republican nominee in 2016. Yet, nothing is harder to define than the so called Middle Class, and The American Dream. The Middle Class is supposed to be an income bracket, yet pundits, politicians and academics have defined it as low as thirty thousand dollars a year and as high as two hundred thousand dollars a year. The American Dream is supposedly enshrined in the Declaration of Independence, on the Statue of Liberty, in Martin Luther King’s speeches and so deeply ingrained in our culture you’d think its in the US Constitution. Where did the American Dream come from? What about the dystopian vision of the American Dream? Really, these concepts – and that’s what they are – mean anything any politician, demagogue, preacher or commentator want them to mean. What policies will Bush use to ensure a ‘middle class rise’? Well, to start with, he says, power will pass from the Federal Government to the states, but the Federal Government will also pass policies that benefit the so called middle class. We won’t repeal Obamacare, we’ll just fix it. We’re going to fix immigration, because illegals are just like the people who came over on the Mayflower. What’s the fix? Truthfully, solidifying what the President has been doing by executive order for the past three years, or more. All of this provokes a question? Aren’t Republicans and Democrats really just different sides of the same coin? Aren’t they both conservative in that they want to continue the status quo? What if what we need is a radical departure, a radical reduction in the scope of Federal Government Power that could be catastrophically dangerous to a Republic. Moreover, as technological developments become industry; That is, the new retail, manufacturing, autonomous machines and software, new ways to use media (like this podcast), sell and buy, hire and find jobs the disruptions will be chaotic. Add more government to that mix, whether it has an R or a D in front of it, and you’re going to have yet more chaos. What are you? How do you know? What are your values? What are your principles? How do you translate these into political ideas, policies, and ideas people can get behind. This is what is meant by organization, and today’s radicals are a long way from being close to having all that work done. Sponsored by Baklund R&D

Podcast 298

Heavy Stories. In the first of two podcasts for the weekend of January 23rd, 2015…the heavy stories. Lots of talk about the State of The Union, whether or not a Republican Congress can govern, factions forming in the House, and all the other static. These stories have obscured for the time being, discussions of the effects of the price of oil. The low price of gas is almost always celebrated by the media as a ‘good thing’ since ‘reductions in the price of gas, act like a tax cut on the economy’. While it is a pleasurable to experience to fill up your tank for less than thirty dollars, throw in a car wash and come away with change from your fifty, we still have a long way to go before the ‘tax cut’ experience kicks in. Suddenly though, the story line has changed. Media outlets and pundits who enthusiastically endorsed lower oil prices as ‘acting like a tax cut’ are suddenly decrying ‘deflation’ in the economy, and writing stories about how deflation can only lead to ruin, and ‘something’ must be done. Meanwhile, the price of beef, milk, cheese, rice and other staples at any store, whether it is a Walmart or a ‘Whole Paycheck’ aren’t ‘deflating’ very quickly. And since wages have not kept pace with even moderate inflation, Americans will need to see further reductions in the rate of inflation (Disinflation) before the celebration begins. And what about those media outlets? Why they have found a new story line … horrible and giant oil companies that are suddenly laying of noble workers in North Dakota and Texas. What will happen when companies start laying people off, due to reduced pricing power? (Editor’s Note: They don’t mention that energy price inputs for companies are also getting cheaper.) Why is the specter of deflation terrifying? Because as money becomes worth more (lower prices mean you can buy more) if you are in debt, it makes paying back the debt that much more difficult. And, the world’s central banks are carrying a lot of debt. So are companies and individuals, and your good old Uncle Sam. Moreover, this nonsense about the United States being economically decoupled from the rest of the world is being exposed. If the rest of the world slips into recession because of bad economic policy and bad monetary policy, and bad political leadership, why would the United States escape the pain, since our policy and political leadership is just as bad as say, Europe, if not worse. This — and many other issues — will also be discussed this weekend at the SD-61 Chili Dinner AND CONTEST in South Minneapolis. Come on out! Sponsored by Mycompletebasement.com.  (Editor’s Note: 06:38 Hours: Well, I just google mapped Midland Texas and characterizing it as in the Dallas metro, is a bit of a stretch, in fact it’s more like the splits. Midland is west of Fort Worth, close to Odessa so it really isn’t as to Dallas as Plymouth, Minnesota is to Minneapolis. I seem to remember a trip to Dallas, seeing an exit for Midland and it seemed a lot closer than it looks on the map.)

Randal O’Toole – Podcast 188

Randal O’Toole shares his knowledge about Light Rail, Street Cars, the Driverless Car, state and city planning, subsidies and the Highway Trust Fund, with The Bob Davis Podcasts. Cities all over the United States are spending billions, sometimes tens of billions to research, and billions more to build, light rail, streetcar and so called ‘high speed’ rail lines. These projects are designed to serve centrally planned cities with subsidized high density housing. Studies say this is what people want, but are the studies right? What is the history of this kind of thinking? O’Toole knows. Moreover, O’Toole is willing to debate, discuss, and write about the issue. Most of the time he doesn’t get enough time on talk radio, but he is a wealth of information. If you want to learn how to argue these issues, Randal O’Toole is the man to learn from. Do we continue to tax people, no matter where they live, to subsidize and maintain expensive transit systems for the elite, and to promote a vision of the future which may be dangerously wrong. Hear him as you have never heard him before, because The Bob Davis Podcasts will give him plenty of time in this podcast, and the companion podcast 189, to share those arguments with you. Sponsored by Baklund R & D.

Podcast 185

Gentrification. A walk through Uptown Minneapolis on a Saturday night. What used to be a bohemian hipster paradise is lousy with 1 percenters. How Uptown was, when it changed, how it changed and what it is like now. Share memories of the Uptown Punks, the run down houses, the Port Arthur, Vonns, The Uptown Bar, Uptown diner, the Rainbow, and the beginnings of the changes in Uptown; Calhoun Square. Sure the people in the neighborhoods wanted a little more vibrant business district, but did they get more than they bargained for? Do government tax breaks, zoning laws, ‘affordable housing’ initiatives, light rail help, or hurt a neighborhood? Sure there are a lot of twenty somethings coming to the bars, and packing in roommates in the expensive new apartments, but what happens when millennials start families? Will they be able to afford houses in Uptown? Minneapolis leads the nation in gentrification; when wealthier residents and businesses pushing out middle and lower middle class businesses and residents. Moreover, tax increases to provide the tax breaks and special deals to get those expensive condos and rental apartments built means residents of the city of Minneapolis pay more, whether it is a carrot cake and coffee at a trendy cafe, or groceries. It’s no secret Minneapolis has one of the most progressive governments in the United States. Are the goals of progressives being met when the 99 percent has to move to cheaper suburbs, and the one percent moves into their old neighborhoods? And yes, I keep calling it ‘regentrification’ but it is in fact, gentrification. Sponsored by X Government Cars. Cover photo art courtesy of Mitch Rossow.