Political Content Boring Audiences-Podcast 672

First of all political content is everywhere. Seems like adding to it is spitting into the wind. Especially relevant is a reality star president who has turned government into a cartoon. In Political Content Boring Audiences-Podcast 672.

Saturated With Political Content

Furthermore journalists, TV Stars, entertainers, and athletes have become players in the daily drama. The last refuge was sports. Most of all sports channels have now joined the melee.

Gets Older Everyday

Political content as entertainment emerged over thirty years ago. It was new then but these days, political content is saturating our lives. It wasn’t always this way. We’ll talk about it in Political Content Boring Audiences-Podcast 672.

What Would Johnny Do?

Millions watched a decidedly nonpolitical show during the peak years of ‘The Tonight Show’ with Johnny Carson. The opposite is true today. Or is it?.

Hundreds of Millions Are On New Platforms

Most noteworthy are entertainment channels on new platforms like SnapChat, Instagram, and You Tube, with more viewers and subscribers than ‘The Tonight Show’ at its peak. Political offerings on any channel pale in contrast. Find out what the stats are in Political Content Boring Audiences-Podcast 672.

Think Different

Much as we believe traditional media is king maybe it’s time to think differently. Furthermore digital platforms for newspapers and radio boast hundreds of millions of subscribers and listeners. As purely entertainment offerings on new platforms get hundreds of millions of views and subscriptions traditional media keeps banging away on politics.

It’s Wallpaper

In conclusion when something is everywhere it isn’t unique or interesting. With so much political stuff it’s natural for content creators to wonder whether audiences are getting bored with it.

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Political Content Boring Audiences-Podcast 672



Podcast 513

Advice for Podcasters. When I introduce myself as a podcaster at business network events, and events where I speak, or when I am singing the praises of podcast advertising to potential clients, they often say, “I want to do my own podcast”. I often have people ask me to tell them how to podcast, how to post their podcasts, what microphone I use, how I record and so on. I don’t give Advice for Podcasters, but this week a FaceBook announcement that a ‘big convention for podcasters’ would be held soon, triggered a response and the need for some Advice for Podcasters. The event includes a lot of radio people who will be on panels on which advice to podcasters will be presented, including ‘critiques’ of podcaster’s podcasts and ‘suggestions’ for what they need to do to ‘sound better’. If you’re a podcaster, should you listen to radio people when they give advice about how to ‘sound better’, or podcast ‘better’? First, podcasting takes a lot of work and effort, especially to stay in it and especially to make any money at all in it. We’re working on the monetization part, but who knows where the solutions will come from as far as making more money. Right now, about 25 percent of the public listens to podcasts – according to radio researchers. I think it is probably much higher, because it’s very hard to assess whether people listen to podcasts and how long they listen, when they listen. There’s no question podcasting – as all on demand services – are going to grow by leaps and bounds as smart phone penetration increases, and as new and more powerful iterations of these devices are developed and purchased. Let’s face it, radio is a contracting industry, and while people in the radio industry don’t like to hear it, it’s a sad fact that the old girl just ain’t what she used to be. What’s amusing about the radio industry is, radio people seem to think they ‘know’ how everything should be done, and aren’t shy about telling everyone else what they should do, and how they should do it. After pooh poohing podcasting for years, companies like Hubbard are jumping into the podcast business (Hubbard Radio just bought a huge share in Podcast One, for example), in an effort to establish a beach head in podcasting, even though everyone in radio will tell you how dumb podcasters are and how terrible they all are. Radio people are trapped in a paradigm, a specific approach to what they do. This approach is what has killed the business, and it will probably never get fixed. The same thing is happening to broadcast television, and movie studios and record labels to a lesser extent. This is a good podcast for you if you’re thinking about podcasting or doing anything creative today. Creative people; artists, writers, musicians, and DJ’s have tools that never existed before, and the ability to reach audiences we would never have been able to reach before the very real technology revolution. This is a change that calls for Revolutionary Thinking. Should you spend thousands of dollars to hang out at some radio convention and have them listen to your ‘tape’ and tell you what they think? Well, my Advice for Podcasters? This podcast is free. Listen to it first and see what you think. Sponsored by Hydrus and Brush Studio in The West End Saint Louis Park.