Post Eclipse Radio-Bob Davis Podcast 849

Walk and Talk

These days things are happening fast and furious. Every now and then I have to take a breath and review some of my past podcasts. Moreover there’s no better way to do a review podcast, than a late night walk and talk. Check it out in Post Eclipse Radio-Bob Davis Podcast 849.

Answering Critics

In addition some of the most recent podcasts have turned out to be controversial. This is a good time to answer my critics and make some additional points.

Post Eclipse Radio

We’re coming off two huge eclipses. A solar eclipse at the beginning of July, and just recently a full moon lunar eclipse. Especially relevant are my observations about eclipse energy.

Pledge Podcast Aftermath

First of all in the last week I did two podcasts that have turned out to be controversial. My podcast covering an emotional demonstration against the Saint Louis Park City Council’s decision to stop saying the pledge of allegiance at some of their meetings, can be found here. And a podcast about Trump’s chances for reelection based on the 2016 and 2018 vote totals in battleground states, here.

Facts Are Controversial

One of the points in my coverage of this protest is most of the protesters screaming and shouting “resign!” at the council meeting to discuss the pledge decision, were not residents of Saint Louis Park. Apparently pointing out that fact was controversial.

Why Don’t You Criticize Democrats!

Also, my critics like to demand that I explain why “you don’t ever criticize democrats”. So, during this walk and talk I’ll tell you. Learn more in Post Eclipse Radio-Bob Davis Podcast 849.

Bought and Paid For Media

Finally because there are no rules or planning for a walk and talk podcast, reviews of recent podcasts evolved into a discussion of bias. It sure seems like we’re living in a world these days where every single ‘news’ source or pundit has been bought. This has contributed to a loss of principles and integrity in our discourse.

Independent Voices

Consequently we all have to be careful with sources. Rather than repeat what someone else said, independent voices move the story forward by researching that facts and sharing them. People don’t seem to be able to do that anymore. This is one of the reasons my recent podcast explored actual vote totals in battleground states the president has to win again in 2020, if he is to have any chance to win reelection, let alone win by a landslide, as some have foolishly predicted.

Clearing The Air and Bias

In conclusion I love these walk and talk podcasts. They help me clear the air. Then I can move on to the next few podcasts. Walk and Talk podcasts also help me to identify my own biases, which usually run to distrust for government in general not against or for political parties or candidates or issue advocacy.

Living Dangerously

Personally I think we need to move beyond responding to flashpoint issues. That means some of us are going to have to listen to opinions we might not agree with as we develop new principles that lead to working policy. I’ve always lived dangerously by talking about things just before they go viral. These days I think that’s a real good place to be.

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Post Eclipse Radio-Bob Davis Podcast 849

 

 

 

 

Podcast 545-Bob Davis Podcast Radio Show-42

Podcast 545-Bob Davis Podcast Radio Show-42. It’s labor day weekend, and as people head to the lake or to the State Fair,┬áPodcast 545-Bob Davis Podcast Radio Show-42 is almost an hour of brand new content for the trip, and for your extra long holiday weekend. We start with a review of the week’s political landscape. Despite better national presidential preference numbers for Trump, state by state polls have not tightened appreciably in key electoral vote-rich states. Hillary Clinton continues to pace Barack Obama’s averages from the 2012 presidential election. Of course the state by state averages can change so we’ll revisit this polling at the end of September and again just before the election at the end of October. Meanwhile, neither of the two mainline presidential candidates is talking about permanently reducing the size, scope and power of governments, federal, state or local. In Minneapolis and Saint Paul we have had yet another example of government overreach in the form of an unelected body of Dark Lords known as the Met Council. After the Minnesota House decided not to fund the controversial South West Light Rail Project, which Minneapolis’ richest and most liberal precincts fiercely oppose, the Met Council decided to issue their own bonds to the tune of more than a hundred million dollars, and ask metro counties under its control to issue tens of millions in debt as well, all to end run the legislature and green light the project. Much has been made of the republican’s distaste for the council, but when they had a chance to drive a stake through its heart earlier this year, the legislature rearranged some of the terms of the councilmen and women, and some of the funding. A local mayor found a way to kill the Met Council last summer by empowering local municipalities to say no to them. Yep, local towns and cities – by state law – cannot say no to the Met Council. This law can be changed by the legislature. Why haven’t they done it? This is just one example of government overreach. In this Labor Day weekend’s radio show the dangers and costs of too much and too powerful government; something neither of the mainline candidates and their parties are going to do anything about. One wants to hand out free education and health care, and the other wants to spend billions to build a wall. Both will increase the size, scope, cost and power of the federal and state governments. This is a discussion we aren’t having now because we’re too busy arguing about whether one of the candidates should go to jail and whether the other one is a fascist. Meanwhile the advocacy media just keeps on covering politics like sports, and people keep watching and listening, all the while complaining about it. This podcast closes with something fun, a throw back podcast to the Minnesota State Fair from the early 80’s; an audio montage done then, just for fun. It’s amazing how much the fair and the people have changed. Sponsored by Brush Studio in the West End and Hydrus Performance.

Podcast 478

On Media. It started out as an idea for a podcast on Friday. A departure from the increasingly tedious, even terrifying and depressing world of politics. As the weekend progressed and opportunities for socializing were offered, ‘On Media’ moldered, then morphed into something more complex. After several attempts to assess what the podcast would be about, one attempt to write it and three attempts to record it, I finally just said the hell with it and decided to talk it out. Thus ‘On Media’. Some of it is a repackaging of ideas behind the podcasts I’ve done about the fact that the mass marketing most of us have gown up in is gone, replaced with a new world of mass specialization. People ask me all the time what is going on in the world. What’s wrong with the media. Or, they tell me the media is at fault. The media is bad. What is the definition of media? What is it’s role in society? What’s really going on? These days we have millions of sources of information available at any time. Any one of those sources can be the most viewed in any single day. It is not unusual for You Tube channels┬áto have more views in a few hours than the cable news channels have all week. In the middle of this is politics. All news coverage is emotional and symbolic. There used to be a tactic called political theater. Now it’s all theater. Politics is media. We are submerged in images of persuasion everywhere we go. From the logos on the clothing we wear, to the TV’s in bars pouring their images into our minds while we eat our burgers. All these images are emotional, and emotional because emotion persuades. You think people seem angry, frustrated, confused? Wonder why? We can’t seem to get a handle on what’s wrong. Our government is the product of something called The Enlightenment. Are we enlightened? Or enslaved? Sponsored by Brush Studio in the West End, Saint Louis Park, and by Hydrus Performance.